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  • Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)
  • Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)
  • Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)
  • Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)
  • Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)
  • Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)
  • Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)
  • Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)
  • Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)
  • Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)
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Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish In Sea)

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Dhow 50 Fils Bahrain Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Fish in Sea)

Obverse: Stylized dhow (sailing boat) above fish in sea, in a central circle. Country name in Arabic and English, Islamic and Gregorian dates with Arabic era suffixes.
Lettering:
دولة البحرين 1412هـ
STATE OF BAHRAIN ‏1992مـ

Translation: State of Bahrain 1412 AH
State of Bahrain 1992 AD

Reverse: Numeric denomination back of boxed denomination within circle. Chain border.
Lettering:
50
فلس
Translation: 50 Fils

Features
Issuer Bahrain
Ruling authority Isa bin Salman Al Khalifa (1961-1999)
Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa (1999-date)
Type Standard circulation coin
Years 1412-1420 (1992-2000)
Calendar Islamic (Hijri)
Value 50 Fils
0.05 BHD = 0.13 USD
Currency Dinar (1965-date)
Composition Copper-nickel
Weight 4.5 g
Diameter 22 mm
Thickness 1.6 mm
Shape Round
Orientation Medal alignment ↑↑
Number N# 5373
References KM# 19, Schön# 16

Wikipedia:
Dhow (Arabic: داو‎, romanized: dāwa; Marathi: dāw) is the generic name of a number of traditional sailing vessels with one or more masts with settee or sometimes lateen sails, used in the Red Sea and Indian Ocean region. Historians are divided as to whether the dhow was invented by Arabs or Indians. Typically sporting long thin hulls, dhows are trading vessels primarily used to carry heavy items, such as fruit, fresh water, or other heavy merchandise, along the coasts of Eastern Arabia,[3] East Africa, Yemen and coastal South Asia (Pakistan, India, Bangladesh). Larger dhows have crews of approximately thirty, smaller ones typically around twelve.

The exact origins of the dhow are lost to history. Most Historians are divided as to whether the dhow was invented by Arabs or Indians before 600 AD. Some claim that the sambuk, a type of dhow, may be derived from the Portuguese caravel.

The dhow was the ship of trade used by the Swahili. They could be massive. It was a dhow that transported a giraffe to Chinese Emperor Yong Le's court, in 1414.

Ships that are similar to the dhow are mentioned or described in the 1001 Nights including various ports where they harboured. The dhow is also associated with the pearl trade.

The Yemeni Hadhrami people, as well as Omanis, for centuries came to Beypore, in Kerala, India for their dhows. This was because of the good timber in the Kerala forests, the availability of good coir rope, and the skilled shipwrights. In former times, the sheathing planks of a dhow's hull were held together by coconut rope. Beypore dhows are known as 'Uru' in Malayalam, the local language of Kerala. Settlers from Yemen, known as 'Baramis', or 'Daramis' which could be derived from the word 'Hardamis' are still active in making urus in Kerala.[citation needed]