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  • Marianne & Liberty Cap 5 Centimes French Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Phrygian Cap)
  • Marianne & Liberty Cap 5 Centimes French Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Phrygian Cap)
  • Marianne & Liberty Cap 5 Centimes French Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Phrygian Cap)
  • Marianne & Liberty Cap 5 Centimes French Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Phrygian Cap)
  • Marianne & Liberty Cap 5 Centimes French Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Phrygian Cap)
  • Marianne & Liberty Cap 5 Centimes French Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Phrygian Cap)
  • Marianne & Liberty Cap 5 Centimes French Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Phrygian Cap)
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Marianne & Liberty Cap 5 Centimes French Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Phrygian Cap)

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Marianne w/Liberty Cap French 5 Centimes Authentic Coin Charm for Jewelry and Craft Making (Phrygian Cap)

The front of the coin bears Marianne in left profile wearing the Phrygian cap of liberty, a national emblem of France, surrounded with the lettering: "REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE" (French Republic).

The back of the coin bears the face value surrounded with a wheat ear, an olive branch and the French motto: "LIBERTE - EGALITE - FRATERNITE" (liberty, equality, fraternity).

Features
Issuer France
Period Fifth Republic (1958-date)
Type Standard circulation coin
Years 1966-2001
Value 5 Centimes (0.05 FRF)
Currency New franc (1960-2001)
Composition Copper-aluminium-nickel (92% Copper, 6% Aluminium, 2% Nickel)
Weight 2 g
Diameter 17 mm
Thickness 1.3 mm
Shape Round
Technique Milled
Orientation Coin alignment ↑↓
Demonetized 17 February 2002
Number N# 2
References F# 125, Gad# 175, Schön# 228, KM# 933, GEM# 22.11

Wikipedia:
The Phrygian cap (/ˈfrɪdʒ(iː)ən/) or liberty cap is a soft conical cap with the apex bent over, associated in antiquity with several peoples in Eastern Europe and Anatolia, including the Balkans, Dacia and Phrygia, where it originated. In first the American Revolution and then French Revolution, it came to signify freedom and the pursuit of liberty, although Phrygian caps did not originally function as liberty caps. The original cap of liberty was the Roman pileus, the felt cap of manumitted (emancipated) slaves of ancient Rome, which was an attribute of Libertas, the Roman goddess of liberty. In the 16th century, the Roman iconography of liberty was revived in emblem books and numismatic handbooks where the figure of Libertas is usually depicted with a pileus. The most extensive use of a headgear as a symbol of freedom in the first two centuries after the revival of the Roman iconography was made in the Netherlands, where the cap of liberty was adopted in the form of a contemporary hat. In the 18th century, the traditional liberty cap was widely used in English prints, and from 1789 also in French prints; by the early 1790s, it was regularly used in the Phrygian form.

It is used in the coat of arms of certain republics or of republican state institutions in the place where otherwise a crown would be used (in the heraldry of monarchies). It thus came to be identified as a symbol of republican government. A number of national personifications, in particular France's Marianne, are commonly depicted wearing the Phrygian cap.

Liberté, égalité, fraternité (French pronunciation: [libɛʁte eɡalite fʁatɛʁnite]), French for "liberty, equality, fraternity", is the national motto of France, and is an example of a tripartite motto. Although it finds its origins in the French Revolution, it was then only one motto among others and was not institutionalized until the Third Republic at the end of the 19th century. Debates concerning the compatibility and order of the three terms began at the same time as the Revolution. The emphasis on Fraternité during the French Revolution led Olympe de Gouges, a female journalist, to write the Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen as a response.

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