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  • Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)
  • Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)
  • Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)
  • Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)
  • Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)
  • Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)
  • Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)
  • Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)
  • Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)
  • Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)
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Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Crafts (Turin Type) (Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité)

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Art Deco Marianne in Phrygian Cap 10 Francs France Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Turin Type) (Liberté, égalité, Fraternité)

Obverse: The head of Marianne, symbol of the French Republic, wearing a Phrygian Cap.
Lettering: REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE
P.TURIN
Engraver: Pierre Turin

Reverse: Denomination above date, inscription below, grain columns flank.
Lettering: 10 FRANCS
LIBERTE
EGALITE
FRATERNITE
Engraver: Pierre Turin

Edge: Reeded

"Executed in the art deco style, an artistic movement which reached its peak at the time of the 1925 exhibition... sober and classic, summoning lines straight and assertive."-Wikipedia

Features
Issuer France
Period Fourth Republic (1946-1958)
Type Standard circulation coin
Years 1947-1949
Value 10 Francs (10)
Currency Franc (1795-1959)
Composition Copper-nickel
Weight 7 g
Diameter 26 mm
Thickness 1.74 mm
Shape Round
Technique Milled
Orientation Coin alignment ↑↓
Demonetized 1 August 1953
Number N# 685
References F# 362, KM# 909, Gad# 811

WIkipedia:
Marianne (pronounced [maʁjan]) has been the national personification of the French Republic since the French Revolution, as a personification of liberty, equality, fraternity and reason, and a portrayal of the Goddess of Liberty.

Marianne is displayed in many places in France and holds a place of honour in town halls and law courts. She is depicted in the Triumph of the Republic, a bronze sculpture overlooking the Place de la Nation in Paris, and is represented with another Parisian statue in the Place de la République. Her profile stands out on the official government logo of the country, is engraved on French euro coins, and appears on French postage stamps. It was also featured on the former franc currency. Marianne is one of the most prominent symbols of the French Republic, and is officially used on most government documents.

Marianne is a significant republican symbol; her French monarchist equivalent is often Joan of Arc. As a national icon Marianne represents opposition to monarchy and the championship of freedom and democracy against all forms of oppression. Other national symbols of Republican France include the tricolor flag, the national motto Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité, the national anthem "La Marseillaise", the coat of arms, and the official Great Seal of France. Marianne also wore a Cockade and a red cap that symbolised Liberty.

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Wikipedia:
The Turin Type is a French monetary engraving model designed and engraved by Pierre Turin and used from 1929 until 1949 in France, and until 1952 in certain colonies .

This model was chosen as part of a national competition organized by the Monnaie de Paris following the monetary overhaul due to the officialization of the Poincaré franc in 1928.

Two modules were selected, one for the 10-franc coin and the other for the 20-franc coin. In a generic way, the obverse represents the right profile of Marianne (the Republic), wearing the Phrygian cap surrounded by a crown of laurels, surrounded by a circular legend REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE , all bearing the signature of the engraver P.TURIN . The reverse presents two stylized ears of wheat framing - from bottom to top - the face value, the year of issue between two different ones, that of the mint (the cornucopia for Paris), and that of the general engraver currencies (a wing for Lucien Bazor ), then, on three lines: FREEDOM EQUALITY FRATERNITY . The slice is streaked.

Testimony of the time, the engraving on the reverse was executed in the art deco style, an artistic movement which reached its peak at the time of the 1925 exhibition, and which extended until 1940: sober and classic, summoning lines straight and assertive.

...these coins were significantly hoarded from 1937 by the French and then gradually disappeared from circulation. For some vintages, there was only a very small print run: those of the 10 francs 1935 and 1936 are rare, as well as those of the 20 francs 1935 and 1939. ...the arrival of the war meant that large quantities of coins found themselves frozen in woolen stockings. Even today, they are found in attics.

In 1945 , the minting of only 10-franc coins was resumed until 1949 , the silver alloy being then replaced by cupro-nickel . These coins were then replaced in 1950 by the 10 francs and 20 francs of the Guiraud type .

The Turin type was taken up, also in cupro-nickel, for coins where the mention ALGERIA replaced the motto Liberty, Equality, Fraternity intended to circulate in this territory; Minted from 1949 to 1952, these coins with a value of 20, 50 and 100 francs were not legal tender in France.

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Pierre Louis Aristide Turin , born on August 3 , 1891 in Sucy-en-Brie where he died onJuly 25 , 1968, was a French medalist and sculptor .

Biography
Pierre Turin entered the School of Fine Arts in Paris where he studied with Frédéric de Vernon , Henri-Auguste-Jules Patey and Jules Coutan . In 1911, he exhibited medals for the first time at the Salon des artistes français .

He was mobilized in August 1914 when World War I broke out. In 1920, he received the first Grand Prix ​​de Rome in medal and fine stone engraving for Une figure de la Paix advancing with a sword in hand, then a gold medal at the 1925 specialized exhibition .

In 1928, competing for the Paris Mint , he was chosen to create a new type of currency with the head of Marianne wearing the Phrygian cap surrounded by an olive crown on the obverse and ears of wheat on the reverse: this is the “Turin type”. This engraving model was used for ten franc coins until 1949 and twenty francs until 1939 , then declined in the French colonies.

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Wikipedia:
The Phrygian cap (/ˈfrɪdʒ(iː)ən/) or liberty cap is a soft conical cap with the apex bent over, associated in antiquity with several peoples in Eastern Europe and Anatolia, including the Balkans, Dacia and Phrygia, where it originated. In first the American Revolution and then French Revolution, it came to signify freedom and the pursuit of liberty, although Phrygian caps did not originally function as liberty caps. The original cap of liberty was the Roman pileus, the felt cap of manumitted (emancipated) slaves of ancient Rome, which was an attribute of Libertas, the Roman goddess of liberty. In the 16th century, the Roman iconography of liberty was revived in emblem books and numismatic handbooks where the figure of Libertas is usually depicted with a pileus. The most extensive use of a headgear as a symbol of freedom in the first two centuries after the revival of the Roman iconography was made in the Netherlands, where the cap of liberty was adopted in the form of a contemporary hat. In the 18th century, the traditional liberty cap was widely used in English prints, and from 1789 also in French prints; by the early 1790s, it was regularly used in the Phrygian form.

It is used in the coat of arms of certain republics or of republican state institutions in the place where otherwise a crown would be used (in the heraldry of monarchies). It thus came to be identified as a symbol of republican government. A number of national personifications, in particular France's Marianne, are commonly depicted wearing the Phrygian cap.

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Wikipedia:
Liberté, égalité, fraternité (French pronunciation: [libɛʁte eɡalite fʁatɛʁnite]), French for "liberty, equality, fraternity", is the national motto of France, and is an example of a tripartite motto. Although it finds its origins in the French Revolution, it was then only one motto among others and was not institutionalized until the Third Republic at the end of the 19th century. Debates concerning the compatibility and order of the three terms began at the same time as the Revolution. The emphasis on Fraternité during the French Revolution led Olympe de Gouges, a female journalist, to write the Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen as a response.