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Homerus Swallowtail Butterfly & Roughbark Lignum-Vitae Flowers 10 Cents Jamaica Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (CONDITION: FINE)

Homerus Swallowtail Butterfly & Roughbark Lignum-Vitae Flowers 10 Cents Jamaica Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (CONDITION: FINE)

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Homerus Swallowtail Butterfly & Roughbark Lignum-Vitae Flowers 10 Cents Jamaica Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Largest Butterfly) (National Flower)

CIRCULATED CONDITION: FINE

Reverse: Homerus Swallowtail butterfly on the blossom of a lignum-vitae tree. (The butterfly is named in honor of the Greek poet Homer. The lignum-vitae tree bears the National Flower of Jamaica.)
Lettering: TEN CENTS
10

Obverse: Coat of Arms with supporters at centre.
Lettering: JAMAICA
OUT OF MANY ONE PEOPLE

Features
Issuer Jamaica
Queen Elizabeth II (1952-date)
Type Standard circulation coin
Years 1969-1989
Value 10 Cents (0.1 JMD)
Currency Dollar (1969-date)
Composition Copper-nickel
Weight 5.75 g
Diameter 23.6 mm
Thickness 1.73 mm
Shape Round
Orientation Medal alignment ↑↑
Demonetized Yes
Number N# 934
References KM# 47

Wikipedia:
Papilio homerus, commonly known as the Homerus swallowtail or Jamaican swallowtail, is the largest butterfly species in the Western Hemisphere. The species is endangered and faces a potentially bleak future. Only two small populations of the Homerus swallowtail remain in a fraction of their original environment. It is endemic to Jamaica where the butterfly simultaneously serves as an icon of national pride and a need for conservation efforts. Over the past half century, the Jamaican swallowtail has been featured on various postal stamps and the Jamaican $1000 bill. In the face of rapid habitat destruction from human disruption and illegal collecting, the Jamaican swallowtail is listed on the Threatened Swallowtail Butterflies of the World by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (Red List) and is protected under international and national level legislation.

The butterfly is named in honor of the Greek poet Homer. The adult butterfly has been described by researchers as “gigantic and magnificent." Females are larger than males and can have a wingspan of 15 cm (6 in). Adults can be seen from morning to afternoon soaring among the canopy of the Neotropical Jamaican rainforests. Its brown-black wings feature a large yellow band and blue and red spotting, making the butterfly easy to spot from far away.

Given the low population and the intense terrain in its forested habitats, few studies of the Jamaican swallowtails have aided to construct a basic biological and ecological understanding of the species. Additionally, very little is known about the swallowtail's behavior. Researchers who study the species all agree that further study is needed to inform and promote an effective conservation strategy for the survival of the butterfly.

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Wikipedia:
Guaiacum officinale, commonly known as roughbark lignum-vitae, guaiacwood or gaïacwood, is a species of tree in the caltrop family, Zygophyllaceae, that is native to the Caribbean and the northern coast of South America.

Description
This small tree is very slow growing, reaching about 10 m (33 ft) in height with a trunk diameter of 60 cm (24 in). The tree is essentially evergreen throughout most of its native range. The leaves are compound, 2.5–3 cm (0.98–1.18 in) in length, and 2 cm (0.79 in) wide. The blue flowers have five petals that yield a bright-yellow-orange fruit with red flesh and black seeds.

Symbolism
Guaiacum officinale is the national flower of Jamaica.[4]

Uses
Guaiacum officinale is one of two species yielding the true lignum vitae, the other being Guaiacum sanctum. Guaiac, a natural resin extracted from the wood, is a colorless compound that turns blue when placed in contact with substances that have peroxidase activity and then are exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Guaiac cards are impregnated with the resin and are used in determining whether stool contains blood. The heme portion of hemoglobin contains peroxidase and will catalyze the oxidation of guaiaconic acid when hydrogen peroxide is placed on the Guaiac card if blood is present in the stool.

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Wikipedia:
The National Library of Jamaica describes the coat of arms as follows:

For Arms, Argent on a Cross Gules five pine-apples slipped OR: and upon a representation of Our Royal Helmet mantled OR doubled Ermine, for the Crest, On a Wreath Argent and Gules, Upon a Log fesse wise a Crocodile Proper: And for the Supporters, On the dexter side a West Indian Native Woman holding in the exterior hand a Basket of Fruits and on the sinister side a West Indian Native Man supporting by the exterior hand a Bow all proper.

Symbolism
The motto of the seal has been a matter of discussion for years since inception. The original motto, INDUS UTERQUE SERVIET UNI is the Latin translation for "The two Indians will serve as one", or rather "Both Indies will serve Together", in reference to the collective servitude of the Taino and Arawak Indians to the colonisers. The motto was replaced in 1962 with the English motto "Out of Many, One People", as tribute to the unity of the different cultural minorities inhabiting the nation. Perhaps as coincidence, the motto has the same meaning as the motto of the United States, E Pluribus Unum.

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O
Otho L
Very nice coin came quickly, just as descr...

Very nice coin came quickly, just as described and very well packed!

C
Crystal
5 stars review from Crystal

5 stars review from Crystal

C
Crystal
5 stars review from Crystal

5 stars review from Crystal

C
Crystal
5 stars review from Crystal

5 stars review from Crystal