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  • Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)
  • Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)
  • Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)
  • Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)
  • Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)
  • Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)
  • Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)
  • Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)
  • Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)
  • Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)
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Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)

Regular price €9,95 EUR
Regular price Sale price €9,95 EUR
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Loonie One Dollar Canada Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Canadian Loon) (Hendecagonal) (11-sided)

Reverse: A Canadian loon, swimming on a lake, with the country name at the top, the date below, and the denomination at the bottom
Lettering: CANADA
DOLLAR

Obverse: The bust of Queen Elizabeth II facing right from when she was 64 years old
Lettering: ELIZABETH II D·G·REGINA
Translation: Elizabeth II, Queen by the grace of God

Features
Location Canada
Issuing entity Royal Canadian Mint
Queen Elizabeth II (1952-date)
Type Standard circulation coin
Years 1990-2003
Value 1 Dollar
1 CAD = USD 0.78
Currency Canadian dollar (1858-date)
Composition Bronze plated nickel
Weight 7 g
Diameter 26.5 mm
Thickness 1.75 mm
Shape Hendecagonal (11-sided)
Technique Milled
Orientation Medal alignment ↑↑
Number N# 467
References KM# 186, Schön# 168

Wikipedia:
The loonie (French: huard), formally the Canadian one-dollar coin, is a gold-coloured coin of the Canadian dollar that was introduced in 1987 and is produced by the Royal Canadian Mint at its facility in Winnipeg. The most prevalent versions of the coin show a common loon, a bird found throughout Canada, on the reverse and Queen Elizabeth II, the nation's head of state, on the obverse. Various commemorative and specimen-set editions of the coin with special designs replacing the loon on the reverse have been minted over the years.

The coin's outline is an 11-sided Reuleaux polygon. Its diameter of 26.5 mm and its 11-sidedness matched that of the already-circulating Susan B. Anthony dollar in the United States, and its thickness of 1.95 mm was a close match to the latter's 2.0 mm. Its gold colour differed from the silver-coloured Anthony dollar; however, the succeeding Sacagawea and Presidential dollars matched the loonie's overall hue. Other coins using a non-circular curve of constant width include the 7-sided British twenty pence and fifty pence coins (the latter of which has similar size and value to the loonie, but is silver in colour).

After its introduction, the coin became a metonym for the Canadian dollar: media often discuss the rate at which the loonie is trading against other currencies. The nickname loonie became so widely recognized that in 2006, the Royal Canadian Mint secured the rights to it. When the Canadian two-dollar coin was introduced in 1996, it was in turn nicknamed the "toonie" (a portmanteau of "two" and "loonie").

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Wikipedia:
The common loon or great northern diver (Gavia immer) is a large member of the loon, or diver, family of birds. Breeding adults have a plumage that includes a broad black head and neck with a greenish, purplish, or bluish sheen, blackish or blackish-grey upperparts, and pure white underparts except some black on the undertail coverts and vent. Non-breeding adults are brownish with a dark neck and head marked with dark grey-brown. Their upperparts are dark brownish-grey with an unclear pattern of squares on the shoulders, and the underparts, lower face, chin, and throat are whitish. The sexes look alike, though males are significantly heavier than females. During the breeding season, loons live on lakes and other waterways in Canada; the northern United States (including Alaska); and southern parts of Greenland and Iceland. Small numbers breed on Svalbard and sporadically elsewhere in Arctic Eurasia. Common loons winter on both coasts of the US as far south as Mexico, and on the Atlantic coast of Europe.

Common loons eat a variety of animal prey including fish, crustaceans, insect larvae, molluscs, and occasionally aquatic plant life. They swallow most of their prey underwater, where it is caught, but some larger items are first brought to the surface. Loons are monogamous; that is, a single female and male often together defend a territory and may breed together for a decade or more. Both members of a pair build a large nest out of dead marsh grasses and other plants formed into a mound along the vegetated shores of lakes. A single brood is raised each year from a clutch of one or two olive-brown oval eggs with dark brown spots which are incubated for about 28 days by both parents. Fed by both parents, the chicks fledge in 70 to 77 days. The chicks are capable of diving underwater when just a few days old, and they fly to their wintering areas before ice forms in the fall.

The common loon is assessed as a species of least concern on the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species. It is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds applies. The United States Forest Service has designated the common loon a species of special status because of threats from habitat loss and toxic metal poisoning in its US range.

The common loon is the provincial bird of Ontario, and it appears on Canadian currency, including the one-dollar "loonie" coin and a previous series of $20 bills. In 1961, it was designated the state bird of Minnesota, and appears on the Minnesota State Quarter.