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  • Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)
  • Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)
  • Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)
  • Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)
  • Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)
  • Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)
  • Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)
  • Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)
  • Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)
  • Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)
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Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)

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Poinsettia & Zebu 1 Franc Madagascar Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Christmas Flower)

Obverse: Poinsettia flower -- the national flower of Madagascar
Lettering: FAMOAHAMBOLAN'NY REPOBLIKA MALAGASY
Translation: Republic of Madagascar

Reverse: Value within horns of Zebu head above sprigs
Lettering: 1 FRANC
IRAIMBILANJA
(Iraimbilanja translates as "franc")

Features
Issuer Madagascar
Period First Republic (1958-1975)
Second Republic (1975-1992)
Third Republic (1992-2010)
Type Standard circulation coin
Years 1965-2002
Value 1 Franc = 1 Iraimbilanja
⅕ MGA = USD 0.000050
Currency Franc (1963-2004)
Composition Stainless steel
Weight 2.4 g
Diameter 17 mm
Thickness 1.59 mm
Shape Round
Technique Milled
Orientation Coin alignment ↑↓
Number N# 1850
References KM# 8

[Below Source: https://www.arc-japanese-translation.com/blog/20161205/index.html
English, Japanese, Malagasy]

Poinsettia: More than Just a Christmas Ornament - The Surprising Meaning behind Madagascar's Floral Emblem
December 5, 2016

Hello again, Naho here. It's a little worrying how more than half of the year has already passed by before I even noticed. Every year towards Christmas there always seems to be endless amounts of work that need to be finished, and I fear this year won't be an exception...

Although often associated with Christmas, poinsettias are in fact the floral emblem of Madagascar - an island famous for its tropical rainforests. This may come across as somewhat surprising, yet this flower does appear to illustrate the typical Malagasy enthusiasm.

Red, White and Green: the National Values behind the Malagasy Triband
Poinsettias are widely known for their 'Christmas' foliage of red and green. However, for the people of Madagascar, the colors of red, green and white represent much deeper meanings.

Red is a signification of the country's sovereignty; Green symbolizes Hope for its people, and White is a tribute to the Malagasy characteristics of being honest and genuine. These combined values are what makes the national flag of Madagascar.

The red "flowers" of poinsettias are actually small leaves called bracts, the vivid color of which is created through photoperiodism as a result of lessened exposure to sunlight. Located near the equator, one might think that it is warm in Madagascar throughout the year. However, depending on the altitude and longitude, some places on the island may experience colder weather - the equivalent of autumn/winter in Japan - during certain periods of time. The unique location and weather conditions of Madagascar provide a perfect environment for growing poinsettias.

Another reason why Malagasy people feel so close to the poinsettia is because of the symbolic shape of its leaf. When folded in half, the shape of a poinsettia leaf looks just like that of the island of Madagascar. This coincidence might be the reason why the Malagasy believe that they share a destiny with the flower.

Wildlife Heaven: An Island Nation with a Vastly Diverse Ecosystem
The island of Madagascar, where poinsettias are broadly appreciated, is extremely rich in biodiversity. It is home to a great variety of wild animals, including different species of lemur. Furthermore, it features the popular tourist destination - the Avenue of the Baobabs, which, with its unique shape and the intensity of its trees, has somewhat become the symbol of Madagascar. When the weather is pleasant, one can see the beautiful silhouette of Baobab trees almost "floating" against the setting sun.

Listed as one of the UNESCO World Heritage sites, Madagascar's Tsingy de Bemaraha Strict Nature Reserve is famous for its Karstic 'tsingy' peaks - or, as the Japanese call it, the "Mountain of Needles that leaves Enma Daio (Lord of the Underworld) in awe". 'Tsingy' has meanings of "knifelike" and "cannot walk on bare feet". Essentially, they are limestone uplands cut into intriguing shapes through tens of thousands of years' weathering and dissolution. Visiting such a nature's spectacle would leave you overwhelmed by the mysterious beauty of planet Earth.

The Different Meanings of a Poinsettia
Amusingly, it wasn't the Malagasy who made the flower famous. Poinsettias were, in fact, named after an American diplomat called Poinsett, who discovered the lovely flower in Mexico and decided to introduce it to his home country.

In Japan, poinsettias convey the messages of "blessings" and "best wishes" that fit perfectly into the context of Christmas. However, it seems that in Western floriography, the interpretation of poinsettias is "to be of good cheer". With such wonderful meanings that come with them, it would be great to see poinsettias not only on Christmas, but throughout the year.

********

Below, From: https://www.evaneos.com/madagascar/holidays/discover/964-1-the-zebu-in-madagascar/

The importance of the omby or zebu in Madagascar
It is a symbol of wisdom, with its big horns and humped back, and an integral part of the landscape of Madagascar. In addition, according to legend, there are as many omby - the Madagascan name for the zebu - as there are people on the island! I hope you found this short explanation of the role of this animal in Madagascan daily life interesting and hope you'll be able to check it out for yourself when you're travelling in Madagascar! 

An impressive workforce
As explained in another article, rice is a particularly important grain in Madagascar. Except that without zebus there would be no paddy fields or else there would be a huge amount of work. In fact, zebus are used to tread down the fields before the rice is planted out. When the ground is well and truly waterlogged, the farmers walk up and down the fields with one or two zebus to soften and prepare the soil for planting out the young rice seedlings. This work is much more effective when done by a zebu than by a human being and having tried it myself, I can confirm that!

An ecological means of transport!
The zebu is also used as an ecological means of transport. In a poor country where few people have motorised vehicles and where the price of fuel is unbelievable - about 1 euro per litre - the zebu often replaces the car. Hitched to a little cart and in exchange for a bit of grass, they carry the locals across the winding tracks in the bush, so need for petrol! I have to say that the zebu cart was my favourite means of transport when I went off to explore the bush. You see the landscape at a less frantic pace than in a four-wheel drive vehicle and it will make your trip much more memorable!

A strong cultural importance…
Zebus are also very important in Madagascan culture, where they are a visible sign of wealth. Owning one or - better still- a herd of zebu shows the success and social staus of the owner. In some ethnic groups, a boy only becomes a man when he has stolen his first zebu! Zebus feature in many ceremonies and have an important role in every stage in the life of a Madagascan. From birth to death, they feature in every ritual, even if that means that they are going to take centre stage...

…even after death
For some ethnic groups in southern Madagascar and for the Bara, Antandroy and Mahafaly people in particular, the zebu is actually the object of a cult. When a Mahafaly man dies, his herd of zebus is sacrificed on the day of his burial. The skulls of the animals are then displayed on the deceased's tomb to show his importance and accompany him in the afterlife. The more zebus the better!

During the ceremony, family, friends and the inhabitants of the village are invited to share the meat of the sacrificed zebus at a great celebration. Here, there is no inheritance and children must create their own herd until their death, and so it goes on...

Written by Simon Hoffmann
185 contributions Updated 3 April 2018
https://www.evaneos.com/madagascar/holidays/discover/964-1-the-zebu-in-madagascar/

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5 stars review from Ellen

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Joel
Thank you Elemintal. The best shop for coi...

Thank you Elemintal. The best shop for coin world collections and on top super service.

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Jeffnerm
Coin was beautiful and in great condition.

Coin was beautiful and in great condition.

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Arrived in time and got what was expected.

Arrived in time and got what was expected.