Skip to product information
  • Angora Ram 750,000 Lira Turkey Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Mohair, Goat)
  • Angora Ram 750,000 Lira Turkey Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Mohair, Goat)
1 of 2

elemintalshop

Angora Ram 750,000 Lira Turkey Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Mohair, Goat)

Regular price £4.91 GBP
Regular price Sale price £4.91 GBP
Tax included. Shipping calculated at checkout.
I'm Cheaper by the Dozen

Angora Goat 750,000 Lira Turkey Authentic Coin Charm for Jewelry and Craft Making (Mohair, Goat)

Commemorative issue
FAO

Obverse: Value and date within sprigs

Lettering: TÜRKİYE CUMHURİYETİ
750.000 LİRA

Reverse
Angora Ram
Lettering: KİMSENİN AÇ KALMAYACAĞI BİR DÜNYA

Features
Issuer Turkey
Period Republic (1923-date)
Type Non-circulating coin
Year 2002
Value 750 000 Lira (750 000 TRL)
Currency Old lira (1923-2005)
Composition Copper-nickel
Weight 6.4 g
Diameter 23.5 mm
Thickness 1.8 mm
Shape Round
Orientation Medal alignment ↑↑
Demonetized Yes
Number N# 6392
References KM# 1162

Wikipedia:
The Angora goat (Turkish: Ankara keçisi) is a breed of domesticated goat, historically known as Angora. Angora goats produce the lustrous fibre known as mohair.

The Angora goat has been regarded by some as a direct descendant of the Central Asian markhor (Capra falconeri). They have been in the region since around the Paleolithic. Angora goats were depicted on the reverse of the Turkish 50 lira banknotes of 1938–1952.

The fleece taken from an Angora goat is called mohair. A single goat produces between four and five kilograms of hair per year. Angoras are shorn twice a year. Angoras, despite their coats, are not directly related to sheep.

Turkey, Argentina, the United States, and South Africa are the top producers of mohair. Secondary producers include New Zealand and Australia. For a long time, Angora goats were bred for their white coats. In 1998, the Colored Angora Goat Breeders Association was set up to promote breeding of colored Angoras. Now, Angora goats produce white, black (deep black to greys and silver), red (the color fades significantly as the goat gets older), and brownish fibers.

Customer Reviews

Based on 1 review
100%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
C
Chloe O
5 stars review from Chloe

5 stars review from Chloe