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  • Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making
  • Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making
  • Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making
  • Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making
  • Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making
  • Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making
  • Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making
  • Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making
  • Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making
  • Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making
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Congkak Mancala Game 10 Sen Malaysia Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making

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Congkak Mancala Game Malaysia Authentic Coin Charm 10 Sen for Jewelry and Craft Making

The back of the coin bears Congkak (a game of Malay origin for two consisting of a board which has several 'houses' and 'storehouses').

The front of the coin bears the value dividing the date below a Hibiscus flower blossom (Binomial name: Hibiscus rosa-Sinensis), the national flower of Malaysia.

Features
Issuer Malaysia
Period Federal elective constitutional monarchy (1963-date)
Type Standard circulation coin
Years 1989-2011
Value 10 Sen
0.1 MYR = 0.024 USD
Currency Ringgit (1967-date)
Composition Copper-nickel
Weight 2.82 g
Diameter 19.4 mm
Thickness 1.37 mm
Shape Round
Orientation Medal alignment ↑↑
Number N# 1656
References KM# 51, Schön# 93

Wikipedia:
Southeast Asian mancalas are a subtype of mancala games predominantly found in Southeast Asia. They are known as congka or congklak in Indonesia, congkak in Malaysia and Brunei, and sungkâ in the Philippines. They differ from other mancala games in that the player's store is included in the placing of the seeds. Like other mancalas, they vary widely in terms of the rules and number of holes used.

The oldest mancala game boards were found in a ruined fort of Roman Egypt and date back to the 4th century AD.[3] The original route of dispersal of mancalas into Southeast Asia is unknown. It may have originally entered Southeast Asia via Austronesian trading routes with South Asia.

Indonesia has the largest variation of Southeast Asian mancalas and thus may be likely to be at least one of the major entry points, though this may also be just an artifact of the country's size. Where the characteristic Southeast Asian ruleset originates from is still unknown.

Southeast Asian mancalas are played by two people on carved wooden elongated boat-shaped boards with cup-shaped holes. Most variants have two sets of seven holes for each player, plus two larger holes at each end which are known as the "stores" of the players. However, the number of holes can vary, ranging from three to nine or more (excluding the stores), and these variants (which can also differ in the rules) can coexist in one area.

Mancala games are played with "seeds" or "counters", which are usually made from small cowrie shells, pebbles, or tamarind seeds. The holes in Southeast Asian mancalas are typically deeper and larger than variants in mainland Asia and Africa, since the seeds used are larger. A total of 98 pieces are used in the seven-hole board version.

Wikipedia on Hibiscus:
The red hibiscus is the flower of the Hindu goddess Kali, and appears frequently in depictions of her in the art of Bengal, India, often with the goddess and the flower merging in form. The hibiscus is used as an offering to goddess Kali and Lord Ganesha in Hindu worship.

In the Philippines, the gumamela (local name for hibiscus) is used by children as part of a bubble-making pastime. The flowers and leaves are crushed until the sticky juices come out. Hollow papaya stalks are then dipped into this and used as straws for blowing bubbles. Together with soap, hibiscus juices produce more bubbles. Also called "Tarukanga" in waray particularly in eastern samar province.

The hibiscus flower is traditionally worn by Tahitian and Hawaiian girls. If the flower is worn behind the left ear, the woman is married or has a boyfriend. If the flower is worn on the right, she is single or openly available for a relationship.

...The hibiscus is a national symbol of Haiti, and the national flower of nations including the Solomon Islands and Niue. Hibiscus syriacus is the national flower of South Korea, and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis is the national flower of Malaysia. Hibiscus brackenridgei is the state flower of Hawaii.

Customer Reviews

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J
Joveren3
great coin! fast service! no problems!...

great coin! fast service! no problems! thanks!

C
Contact285
Envoi rapide et sérieux, merci.

Envoi rapide et sérieux, merci.