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  • Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)
  • Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)
  • Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)
  • Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)
  • Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)
  • Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)
  • Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)
  • Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)
  • Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)
  • Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)
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Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Tepuis) 2016 (Indigenous Resistance)

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Harpy Eagle & Cacique Guaicaipuro 2000 Bolivares Venezuela Authentic Banknote for Jewelry and Collage (Canaima National Park) (Tepuis) (Indigenous Resistance)

Reverse: Harpy Eagle,
Canaimia National Park
Salto Ucaima Waterfalls,
Kurun & Venado Tepuis (plateaux)
Coat of arms of Venezuela.
Lettering: Águila Arpía, Salto Ucaima y Tepuyes Venado y Kurún, Parque Nacional Canaima
Banco Central de Venezuela
2000 DOS MIL
BOLIVARES
Translation:
Central Bank of Venezuela, Harpy Eagle, Ucaima Falls and Kurun & Venado Tepuis, Canaima National Park
2000 TWO THOUSAND BOLIVARES

Obverse: Cacique Guaicaipuro; spears; masks
Lettering: República Bolivariana de Venezuela
2000 DOS MIL
BOLIVARES
PAGADEROS AL PORTADOR EN LAS OFICINAS DEL BANCO
PRESIDENT PRIMER VICEPRESIDENTE BCV
Translation: Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela
TWO THOUSAND BOLIVARS
PAYABLE TO BEARER IN THE BANK OFFICES
PRESIDENT FIRST VICE PRESIDENT BCV

Features
Issuer Venezuela
Issuing bank Central Bank of Venezuela
Period Bolivarian Republic (1999-date)
Type Standard banknote
Year 2016
Value 2,000 Bolívares (2000 VEF)
Currency Bolívar Fuerte (2008-2018)
Composition Paper
Size 157 × 69 mm
Shape Rectangular
Demonetized 5 December 2018
Number N# 205362
References P# 96

Wikipedia:
The harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja) is a neotropical species of eagle. It is also called the American harpy eagle or Brazilian harpy eagle. It is the largest and most powerful raptor found throughout its range, and among the largest extant species of eagles in the world. It usually inhabits tropical lowland rainforests in the upper (emergent) canopy layer. Destruction of its natural habitat has caused it to vanish from many parts of its former range, and it is nearly extirpated from much of Central America.

The species name harpyja and the word harpy in the common name harpy eagle both come from Ancient Greek harpyia (ἅρπυια). They refer to the harpies of Ancient Greek mythology. These were wind spirits that took the dead to Hades or Tartarus, and were said to have a body like a vulture and the face of a woman.

The harpy eagle is the national bird of Panama and is depicted on the coat of arms of Panama. The 15th harpy eagle released in Belize, named "Hope", was dubbed "Ambassador for Climate Change", in light of the United Nations Climate Change Conference 2009.

The bird appeared on the reverse side of the Venezuelan 2,000 bolívares fuertes note.

The harpy eagle was the inspiration behind the design of Fawkes the Phoenix in the Harry Potter film series.[75] A live harpy eagle was used to portray the now-extinct Haast's eagle in BBC's Monsters We Met.

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Wikipedia:
Cacique Guaicaipuro is a legendary native (indigenous) Venezuelan chief of both the Teques and Caracas tribes.

Life
Guaicaipuro formed a powerful coalition of different tribes which he led during part of the 16th century against the Spanish conquest of Venezuelan territory in the central region of the country, specially in the Caracas valley. He commanded, among others, Cacique (Spanish: Indian chief) Naiguatá, Guaicamacuto, Chacao, Aramaipuro, Paramaconi and his own son Baruta. Guaicaipuro is one of the most famous and celebrated Venezuelan Caciques. The area occupied by the Teques was populated by several native groups each with its own cacique. Guaicaipuro's tribe, which was located in what is now San Antonio de los Altos, was the largest one. He had a son named Baruta, himself a Cacique. The name of two of his sisters is also known: Tiora and Caycape.

The Spaniards discovered gold in the area of the land of the Teques, and as they started to exploit the mines, Guaicaipuro attacked, forcing the Spanish to leave. Following the attack, the governor of the province of Venezuela sent Juan Rodríguez Suárez to pacify the area, which apparently he did after defeating Guaicaipuro in several engagements. Believing he had achieved his task, the Spanish commander and his soldiers left the area leaving behind miners and three of his sons. Once the Spanish soldiers had left, Guiacaipuro assaulted the mines killing all the workers as well as the sons of Rodríguez Suárez. Immediately thereafter, Rodríguez Suárez who was on his way to the city of Valencia, with a small contingent of only six soldiers, with the purpose of meeting Lope de Aguirre, another Spanish conquistador, was ambushed by Guaicaipuro and killed.

After these successes Guaicaipuro became the main and central figure in the uprising of all the native tribes in the vicinity of the Caracas valley, and managed to unite all the tribes under his command. In 1562 they defeated an expeditionary force led by Luis Narváez. Due to the fierce attacks, the Spanish retreated away from the area for several years.

In 1567 the city of Santiago de Leon de Caracas was founded in the Caracas valley. The Spanish worried about the nearby presence of Guaicaipuro and his men, and given his previous attacks, they decided not to wait for him to attack, and as a preventive move Diego de Losada, (founder of Caracas) ordered the mayor of the city, Francisco Infante to undertake Guacaipuro's capture. In 1568 Infante and his men were led by native guides to the hut where Guaicaipuro lived and they set it on fire to force the native cacique out. Guaicaipuro stormed out and found death at the hands of the Spanish soldiers.

Legacy
The county of Guaicaipuro in the state of Miranda, Venezuela was named in his honor. Later the county reformed to the Guaicaipuro Municipality.

Amidst the new policy started by former president Hugo Chávez of re-assessing and valuing the role of Venezuela's Caciques and indigenous peoples in a historical narrative which has traditionally given greater prominence to the Spanish conquistadores, Guaicaipuro's remains were symbolically moved (his remains have never been found) under ceremonial pomp to the national pantheon on December 8, 2001.

Under the same new policy president Chávez often mentioned Guaicaipuro and other native chiefs in his speeches with the purpose of inspiring Venezuelans to resist what he called the policies of American imperialists and interventionists directed towards Venezuela. Most notably, he did it every year during the October 12 holiday, which after being renamed several years ago Dia de la Raza (previously America's Discovery Day), was recently renamed as Día de la Resistencia Indígena (Day of Indigenous Resistance).

The Venezuelan government named as Mission Guaicaipuro one of its ongoing Bolivarian Missions; this specific program seeks to restore communal land titles and human rights to Venezuela's, still remaining, 33 indigenous tribes.

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Wikipedia:
Canaima National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Canaima) is a 30,000 km2 (12,000 sq mi) park in south-eastern Venezuela that roughly occupies the same area as the Gran Sabana region. It is located in Bolívar State, reaching the borders with Brazil and Guyana.

Canaima National Park is the second largest park in Venezuela, after Parima-Tapirapecó, and sixth biggest national park in the world. It is the size of Belgium or Maryland.

The park protects part of the Guayanan Highlands moist forests ecoregion. About 65% of the park is occupied by plateaus of rock called tepuis, which are a kind of table-top mountain millions of years old, with vertical walls and almost flat tops. These constitute a unique biological environment and are also of great geological interest. Their sheer cliffs and waterfalls (including Angel Falls, which is the highest waterfall in the world, at 979 metres (3,212 ft) create spectacular landscapes. The most famous tepuis in the park are Mount Roraima, the tallest and easiest to climb, and Auyantepui, the site of Angel Falls. The tepuis are sandstone and date back to a time when South America and Africa were part of a super-continent.

The park is home to indigenous Pemon Indians, part of the Carib linguistic group. The Pemon have an intimate relationship with the tepuis, and believe they are the home of the 'Mawari' spirits. The park is relatively remote, with only a few roads connecting towns. Most transport within the park is done by light plane from the airstrips built by various Capuchin missions, or by foot and canoe. Pemons have developed some basic and luxurious camps, which are mainly visited by tourists from across the world.

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Wikipedia:
The current coat of arms of Venezuela was primarily approved by the Congress on April 18, 1836, undergoing small modifications through history, reaching the present version.

The coat of arms was established in the Law of the National Flag, Shield and Anthem (Ley de Bandera, Escudo e Himno Nacionales), passed on February 17, 1954, by the military governor of Venezuela, Marcos Pérez Jiménez. The shield is divided in the colors of the national flag. In the dexter chief, on a red field, wheat represents the union of the 20 states of the Republic existing at the time and the wealth of the nation. In sinister chief, on a yellow field, weapons (a sword, a sabre and three lances) and two national flags are tied by a branch of laurel, as a symbol of triumph in war. In base, on a deep blue field, a wild white horse (representing Simón Bolívar's white horse Palomo) runs free, an emblem of independence and freedom.

Above the shield are two crossed cornucopias (horns of plenty), pouring out wealth. The shield is flanked by an olive branch and another of palm, both tied at the bottom of the coat with a large band that represents the national tricolour (yellow for the nation's wealth, blue for the ocean separating Venezuela from Spain, and red for the blood and courage of the people). The following captions appear in golden letters on the blue stripe:

19 de Abril de 1810 (April 19, 1810) 20 de Febrero de 1859 (February 20, 1859)
Independencia (Independence) Federación (Federation)
República Bolivariana de Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela)

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Brother T
I recommended Elimental before, and I reco...

I recommended Elimental before, and I recommend them again now. I just received my order with quite a few low-priced but beautiful, unused banknotes and a few coins. I got a beautiful 2000 bolivares Venezuela banknote with 16th c. Venezuelan Indian chief Cacique Guaicaipuro (obverse) and the harpy owl on the reverse. Beautiful!