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  • Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)
  • Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)
  • Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)
  • Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)
  • Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)
  • Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)
  • Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)
  • Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)
  • Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)
  • Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)
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Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)

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Horse Racing, Soyombo & Endless Knot 50 Möngö Mongolia Authentic Banknote Money for Jewelry and Collage (1993) (Young Riders) (Naadam)

Obverse: Soyombo symbol; Horse Racing--one of the three Manly Sports, celebrated during annual Naadam festival (children from 5 to 13 are chosen as jockeys). Also, Buddhist Endless Knot.
Script: Mongolian / Manchu
Lettering:
ᠮᠤᠩᠭᠤᠯ ᠤᠯᠤᠰ
᠕᠐ ᠮᠥᠩᠭᠥ
ᠮᠣᠩᠭᠣᠯ ᠪᠠᠩᠬᠢ
Translation: Mongolia, 50 Möngö, Bank of Mongolia

Reverse: Horse Racing (one of the three Manly Sports, celebrated during annual Naadam festival), and Buddhist Endless Knot.
Script: Cyrillic
Lettering: МОНГОЛ УЛС
50 МӨНГӨ
МОНГОЛБАНК
Translation: Mongolia, 50 Möngö, Bank of Mongolia

Features
Issuer Mongolia
Period Republic (1992-date)
Type Standard banknote
Year 1993
Value 50 Möngö (0.50 MNT)
Currency Tögrög (1925-date)
Composition Paper
Size 45 × 90 mm
Shape Rectangular
Demonetized Yes
Number N# 203099
References P# 51

Wikipedia:
Naadam (Mongolian: Наадам, classical Mongolian: ᠨᠠᠭᠠᠳᠤᠮNaɣadum, [ˈnaːdəm], literally "games") is a traditional festival in Mongolia. The festival is also locally termed "eriin gurvan naadam" (эрийн гурван наадам), "the three games of men". The games are Mongolian wrestling, horse racing, and archery, and are held throughout the country during midsummer. Women have started participating in the archery and girls in the horse-racing games, but not in Mongolian wrestling.

In 2010, Naadam was inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of UNESCO.

Unlike Western horse racing, which consists of short sprints generally not much longer than 2 km, Mongolian horse racing as featured in Naadam is a cross-country event, with races 15–30 km long. The length of each race is determined by age class. For example, two-year-old horses race for 16 km (10 mi) and seven-year-olds for 27 km (17 mi). Up to 1000 horses from any part of Mongolia can be chosen to participate. Race horses are fed a special diet.

Children from 5 to 13 are chosen as jockeys and train in the months preceding the races. While jockeys are an important component, the main purpose of the races is to test the skill of the horses.

Before the races begin, the audience sings traditional songs and the jockeys sing a song called Gingo. Prizes are awarded to horses and jockeys. The top five horses in each class earn the title of airgiyn tav and the top three are given gold, silver, and bronze medals. The winning jockey is praised with the title of tumny ekh or leader of ten thousand. The horse that finishes last in the Daaga race (two-year-old horses race) is called bayan khodood (meaning "full stomach"). A song is sung to the bayan khodood wishing him luck to be next year's winner.

*****

Wikipedia:
The Soyombo symbol (Mongolian: Соёмбо, ᠰᠣᠶᠤᠮᠪᠤ from Sanskrit: svayambhu) is a special character in the Soyombo alphabet invented by Zanabazar in 1686. The name "Soyombo" is derived from Sanskrit svayambhu "self-created". It serves as a national symbol of Mongolia, to be found on the Flag of Mongolia, the Emblem of Mongolia, and on many other official documents.

In the Soyombo alphabet, the two variations of the Soyombo symbol are used to mark the start and end of a text. It is thought to be possible that the symbol itself may predate the script.

Symbolism
The Soyombo has ten elements in the columnar arrangement of abstract and geometric symbols and patterns. They are fire, sun, moon, two triangles, two horizontal rectangles, the Taijitu (yin and yang) and two vertical rectangles. The elements in the symbol are given the following significance (from top):

Fire is a general symbol of eternal growth, wealth, and success. The three tongues of the flame represent the past, present, and future.
Sun (●) and moon symbolizes the existence of the Mongolian nation for eternity as the eternal blue sky. Mongolian symbol of the sun, moon and fire derived from the Xiongnu.
The two triangles (▼) allude to the point of an arrow or spear. They point downward to announce the defeat of interior and exterior enemies.
The two horizontal rectangles (▬) give stability to the round shape. The rectangular shape represents the honesty and justice of the people of Mongolia, whether they stand at the top or at the bottom of society.
The Taijitu symbol (☯) illustrates the mutual complement of man and woman. It is interpreted as two fishes, symbolizing vigilance, because fish never close their eyes.
The two vertical rectangles (▮) can be interpreted as the walls of a fort. They represent unity and strength, relating to a Mongolian proverb: "The friendship of two is stronger than stone walls."

Uses
The Soyombo symbol has appeared on the national Flag of Mongolia since its independence in 1911 (except between 1940-1945). It served as the Emblem of Mongolia from 1911 to 1940, and was included in the design again in 1992. Mongolian Armed Forces vehicles bear the symbol as a marking.

The symbol is seen all over the country, especially on a hillside outside of Ulaanbaatar.

The flag and coat of arms of Buryatia as well as the flag of Agin-Buryat Okrug in Russia, and that of the Inner Mongolian People's Party display the top elements (Flame, Sun, and Moon).

******

Wikipedia:
The endless knot or eternal knot (Sanskrit: śrīvatsa; simplified Chinese: 盘长结; traditional Chinese: 盤長結; pinyin: pánzhǎng jié; Tibetan དཔལ་བེའུ། dpal be'u; Mongolian Түмэн өлзий) is a symbolic knot and one of the Eight Auspicious Symbols. It is an important symbol in Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism. It is an important cultural marker in places significantly influenced by Tibetan Buddhism such as Tibet, Mongolia, Tuva, Kalmykia, and Buryatia. It is also found in Celtic and Chinese symbolism.

History
The endless knot symbol appears on clay tablets from the Indus Valley Civilization (2500 BC), and the same symbol also appears on a historic era inscription.

Interpretations
Buddhism
Various Buddhist interpretations of the symbol are:

The endless knot iconography symbolised Samsara i.e., the endless cycle of suffering of birth, death and rebirth within Tibetan Buddhism.
The inter-twining of wisdom and compassion.
Interplay and interaction of the opposing forces in the dualistic world of manifestation, leading to their union, and ultimately to harmony in the universe.
The mutual dependence of religious doctrine and secular affairs.
The union of wisdom and method.
The inseparability of emptiness (shunyata) and dependent origination, the underlying reality of existence.
Symbolic of knot symbolism in linking ancestors and omnipresence (refer etymology of Tantra, Yoga and religion) (see Namkha.)
Since the knot has no beginning or end it also symbolizes the wisdom of the Buddha.

Hinduism
In Hinduism, Srivatsa mentioned as 'connected to shree', i.e the goddess Lakshmi. It is a mark on the chest of Vishnu where his consort Lakshmi resides. According to the Vishnu purana, the tenth avatar of Vishnu, Kalki, will bear the Shrivatsa mark on his chest. It is one of the names of Vishnu in the Vishnu Sahasranamam. Srivatsa is considered to be auspicious symbol in Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka.

Jainism
In Jainism it is one of the eight auspicious items, an asthamangala, however found only in the Svetambara sect. It is often found marking the chests of the 24 Saints, the tirthankaras. It is more commonly referred to as the Shrivatsa.

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Shannon Smith
Beautiful bill! So glad this is a part of...

Beautiful bill! So glad this is a part of my collection now. Will be buying from here again!

C
C.C.
5 stars review from Catherine

5 stars review from Catherine