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  • Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)
  • Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)
  • Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)
  • Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)
  • Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)
  • Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)
  • Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)
  • Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)
  • Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)
  • Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)
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Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)

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Sunshine Girl & Ashoka Lion Capitol 1 Rupee India Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Care for the Girl Child)

Commemorative issue: SAARC Year - Care for the Girl Child

Reverse: Girl cutout below sun, SAARC symbol at left
NOTE: S.A.A.R.C. stands for South Asian Association for Regional Co-operation
Lettering: खुशहाल बालिका भविष्य देश का
CARE FOR THE GIRL CHILD
SAARC YEAR 1990

Obverse: Asoka lion pedestal, denomination below
Lettering: भारत INDIA
सत्यमेव जयते
रुपया 1 RUPEE

Features
Issuer India
Period Republic (1950-date)
Type Circulating commemorative coin
Year 1990
Value 1 Rupee
1 INR = USD 0.013
Currency Rupee (decimalized, 1957-date)
Composition Copper-nickel
Weight 6 g
Diameter 26 mm
Shape Round
Technique Milled
Orientation Medal alignment ↑↑
Number N# 10622
References KM# 87

Care for a Girl Child' Commemorative Coin
10 Aug 2018 Fri
In ancient India, a girl child is considered a sign of goddess Laxmi. But later as the time passed, the status of the girl in a society declined. The perception of the girl was not welcomed in the society; she faced discrimination and humiliation. When it comes to the sector like education, good health, and opportunities, she was neglected just because of her gender. Many social reformers like Rajaram Mohan Roy, Swami Dayananda Saraswati, Ishwar Chandra Vidhyasagar came forward and they gave their best for improving the status of women.

To spread the awareness about girl child in the year 1990 SAARC had declared this year as ‘CARE FOR GIRL CHILD’. The full form of SAARC is ‘South Asian Association for Regional Co-operation’. ‘SAARC’ is formed by 8 countries (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Indian, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Pakistan), with its headquarters at Kathmandu.

The Indian government had issued 1 Rupee commemorative coin honouring girl child in the year 1990. The obverse of this coin depicts the picture of the small girl under the sun and the inscription ‘SAARC YEAR’ and 1990 below and with the logo of ‘SAARC’ to the left side of the girl, The legend ‘KHUSHAL BALIKA BHAVISHYA DESH KA’ in Devanagari and ‘CARE FOR THE GIRL CHILD’ in roman around. The Reverse of the coin depicts ‘ASHOKA'S LION’ with the legend ‘SATYAMEVA JAYATE’ and denomination 1 below, the inscription ‘BHARAT RUPAYE’ in Devanagari to right and ‘INDIAN RUPEE’ in roman to left.
https://www.mintageworld.com/media/detail/7323-care-for-a-girl-child-commemorative-coin/

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Wikipedia:
The Lion Capital of Ashoka is a sculpture of four Asiatic lions standing back to back, on an elaborate base that includes other animals. A graphic representation of it was adopted as the official Emblem of India in 1950. It was originally placed on the top of the Ashoka pillar at the important Buddhist site of Sarnath by the Emperor Ashoka, in about 250 BCE during his rule over the Maurya Empire. The pillar, sometimes called the Aśoka Column, is still in its original location, but the Lion Capital is now in the Sarnath Museum, in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India. Standing 2.15 metres (7 feet) high including the base, it is more elaborate than the other very similar surviving capitals of the pillars of Ashoka bearing the Edicts of Ashoka that were placed throughout India several of which feature single animals at the top; one other damaged group of four lions survives, at Sanchi.

The capital is carved out of a single block of polished sandstone, and was always a separate piece from the column itself. It features four Asiatic Lions standing back to back. They are mounted on an abacus with a frieze carrying sculptures in high relief of an elephant, a galloping horse, a bull, and a lion, separated by intervening spoked chariot-wheels. The whole sits upon a bell-shaped lotus. The capital was originally crowned by a 'Wheel of Dharma' (Dharmachakra popularly known in India as the "Ashoka Chakra"), with 32 spokes, of which a few fragments were found on the site. A 13th-century replica of the Sarnath pillar and capital in Wat Umong near Chiang Mai, Thailand built by King Mangrai, preserves its crowning Ashoka Chakra or Dharmachakra. The wheel on the capital, below the lions, is the model for the one in the flag of India.jai hind

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S
Shannon Smith
Very nice! I'm excited to add this coin to...

Very nice! I'm excited to add this coin to my collection!

J
Jackpoint
Quick shipping, lovely quality, and good c...

Quick shipping, lovely quality, and good care went into the packaging