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  • Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)
  • Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)
  • Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)
  • Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)
  • Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)
  • Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)
  • Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)
  • Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)
  • Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)
  • Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)
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Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry (Gold Dome) (Goldhaube)

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Wachau Woman in Gold Pleated Brettlhaube Headdress 10 Schilling Austria Authentic Coin Money for Jewelry and Craft Making (Gold Dome) (Pleated Bonnet) (Goldhaube) (Golden Headdress)

CONDITION: Extra Fine

Reverse: Woman wearing the traditional pleated golden bonnet of Wachau, in Lower Austria, the "Brettlhaube".
Lettering: SCHILLING 10

Obverse: Austria coat of arms (an eagle carries the Austrian escutcheon) and the state title
Lettering: • REPUBLIK • ÖSTERREICH
Translation: Republic of Austria

Features
Issuer Austria
Period Second Republic (1945-date)
Type Standard circulation coin
Years 1974-2001
Value 10 Schilling (10 ATS)
Currency Second Schilling (1945-2001)
Composition Copper-nickel plated nickel
Weight 6.25 g
Diameter 26 mm
Thickness 1.46 mm
Shape Round
Orientation Medal alignment ↑↑
Demonetized 02-28-2002
Number N# 743
References KM# 2918, Schön# 112

Gold cap
The costumes worn by the ladies in Lower Austria on high festivals and holidays their gold bonnets, a magnificent headdress and once a valuable, well-kept treasure. The gold material used in the embroidery made the hoods to a luxury item and status symbol, its importance in the second half of the 19th century was lost. Only in the Wachau this tradition, which was widespread in the whole of eastern Austria, was preserved.
Source: http://www.krahuletzmuseum.at/en/2018/11/26/2710/

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Gold Dome is the umbrella term for a variety of costumes associated hoods of women in southern Germany and in Austria . From the 17th century onwards, they were worn by citizens in the cities and later also in the countryside. Characteristic are the silk and gold interwoven threads, gold and sequin embroidery , lahn and tinsel.

There are gold bonnets in various regional forms, such as B. the Munich Riegelhaube , the Regina hood and the Radhaube in Swabia, Kranl, Nürnberger Flinderhaube, Linzer Goldhaube, Wachau "Brettlhaube" and many others.

In the development of the Linz gold bonnet from earlier bonnet shapes, antique influences from the Napoleonic era ( Empire style ) played a role.

The extinction of traditional costumes in the 19th century brought most gold bonnets to the brink of oblivion. Today they are cared for and worn again in the course of the traditional costume renewal movement and their production is taught in courses. Because of the high workload (e.g. over 300 hours for a bolt hood) and the correspondingly high costs, they are almost exclusively manufactured in-house. Especially in Upper Austria and Salzburg, the gold bonnet is now worn again by women on high church holidays.

From 1957 to 2001 the Wachau gold hood (Brettlhaube) adorned the obverse of the 10 Schilling coin.
https://second.wiki/wiki/goldhaube_kleidung

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The German word Goldhaube (gold headdress, hat or bonnet) is the generic term for different types of hat used with traditional costumes by women in southern Germany and Austria. These types of hats were used by burgesses in the cities from the 17th century onwards; later they were used by women in rural districts. They are characterised by silken and gold threads woven into a base material, and are decorated with gold embroidery, sequins, tatted lace (Lahn) and glitter (Flitter).

There are many different types of Goldhauben: for example, the Riegelhaube from Munich, the Reginahaube of the Allgäu, the Kranl, the Flinderhaube from Nuremburg, the Goldhaube of Linz, the Wachauer “Brettlhaube“, and the various types of halo-style headdresses — the Radhaube — as well as many more. The different types of Goldhaube and especially the Radhauben seem to all have been developed from the baroque Bockelhaube. These styles were worn by Catholics as Protestant women wore other styles of hat such as small pinners (Flügelhaube), a style used in the 17th and 18th centuries, made of black moiré ribbons or the Black Forest Bollenhut (see Germany: Schwarzwald).

The most common form of gold headdress is the Reginahaube, a form of halo hat, which comes in numerous variations and sizes. The largest diameters (up to 50 cm) are found in the halo hats worn by the wives of rich farmers, millers or hostellers in the second half of the 19th century. These were made of golden or silver tatted lace in the hollow fibre lace technique (Hohlspitzentechnik), tulle and chenille. In addition, there are half-halo hats as a sort of preliminary stage of halo development, e.g. the Pfauenrädle, as well as bell-shaped hats, the Schirmhaube (Spitzhaube).

One of the best-known styles of golden headdress is the “Linzer Goldhaube” with its beautiful golden appliques made of sequins and golden threads, which was widely used throughout southern Germany and Austria (from Ulm in Bavaria, throughout the Danube valley to Vienna, in the Steyr, Krems, Alm, Ybbs and Erlauf valleys and down to Graz, Klagenfurt and Villach). It is still worn in Upper (and parts of Lower) Austria on festive occasions as a symbol of the well-to-do bourgeoisie.

The demise of regional costumes in the 19th century meant that most of the gold hat styles were virtually forgotten. Due to the renewal of interest in Trachten, they were again produced and worn on special occasions. Nowadays, their production is taught in courses as the large number of (wo)man hours needed (e.g. a Riegelhaube requires more than 300 hours, while a Villinger Radhaube in either silver or gold takes more than 400 hours) would mean they would be prohibitively expensive if not produced by the wearer.

Source: https://babogenglish.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/germany-and-austria-hats-2/

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Wikipedia:
The symbols and emblems used in the Austrian arms are as follows:

The Eagle: Austria's sovereignty (introduced 1919)
The escutcheon: Emblem of Austria [de] (late Middle Ages, reintroduced 1915; see also: Flag of Austria)
The mural crown: Middle class (bourgeoisie, introduced 1919)
The sickle: Farmer's class (peasants, introduced 1919)
The Hammer: Working class (introduced 1919)
The broken chains: Liberation from German occupation (added 1945)
Discussions about the arms have been triggered in the past by differing political interpretations, especially by the use of the hammer and the sickle and the broken chains, since the crossed hammer and sickle are a widespread symbol of communism, as is the breaking of chains. Surveys have however confirmed, that understanding of the actual symbolism of the arms is widespread.

On the one hand the arms serve as a new republican symbol, on the other as a modified version of the historical Habsburg arms. The current version of the arms is often regarded as being reminiscent of the double-headed eagle of the Habsburg monarchy. According to this interpretation, the single headed eagle alludes, in the sense of the removal of the left hand, "Hungarian" head, to the removal of the eastern part of the Habsburg Empire. However, Addendum 202 to the 1919 Law on the State Arms and the State Seal of the Republic of German Austria states expressly that the "new" single headed Austrian eagle is based not on the double headed eagle (symbol of the Habsburgs since 1804, and previously of the Holy Roman Empire), but rather on the "symbol of the legions of the Roman Republic", the Aquila. The Austrian federal states have however retained pre-republican heraldic traditions (mostly heraldic images from the Middle Ages, but also diverse accoutrements such as archducal and ducal hats, and knights' helmets).